Man enough to be a Girl Scout: Spring dad shares why he’s a troop leader


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John Wisinger understands the value of youth organizations that teach kids leadership skills and offer outdoor experiences. His father was always involved with him and his brothers as they developed those skills and created life long memories together. It was only natural for him to want to replicate similar experiences with his daughter. He doesn’t only impact her life but also the rest of the girls he serves as a Girl Scout volunteer and troop leader.

Wisinger, a computer and electronics engineer for Halliburton, started his Girl Scout journey last year, when he registered his daughter to be a first-year Girl Scout Daisy, the Girl Scout level for girls in kindergarten to first grade. According to him, Girl Scouts was a great program for his daughter to keep the friendships she developed in pre-school because most of them were going to different schools for kindergarten.

“[I] wanted my daughter to experience Girl Scouting as soon as she was old enough,” said Wisinger. “I had so much fun working with other kids after I became an adult that I was, and still am, really excited about getting to work with my daughter and her friends.”

Wisinger likes how Girl Scouting allows him and his daughter the opportunity to spend time together. He gets to enjoy watching how she interacts with other girls her age which is something he could not see before.

“The two of us have always enjoyed making and building things together, and almost every Girl Scout badge is an opportunity to make or build something, especially the newer STEM badges,” Wisinger said.

As a volunteer, Wisinger has also learned new skills, including patience and how to keep kindergarteners focused on a task. Most importantly, he understands that the time he is spending with these girls will positively impact their lives.

“As parents we all want to raise our children to be the best people they can be and [Girl Scouts] is a great way to have fun and build the leaders of tomorrow,” said Wisinger. “We started a troop with zero Girl Scout experience, and between the leader guides and the Volunteer Toolkit, it couldn’t have been easier to get up and running.”

To learn more about Girl Scouts or to volunteer, visit www.gssjc.org.